KOOKOOLAN FARMS
15713 Highway 47, Yamhill, Oregon 97148 ... email kookoolan@gmail.com ... phone Farmer Chrissie at (503) 730-7535
organic farming practices ... pasture-raised poultry, meats, and eggs ... mead and kombucha

Recipes
Added 2/4/13:

PALEOPork and Charred Brussels Sprouts with Chili Lime Sauce,
From Sunset Magazine Feb 2013:
Chef Gregory Gourdet prepares modern Asian cuisine at Portland's Departure Restaurant + Lounge. But at home, the Bikram yoga disciple and marathoner adheres strictly to the Paleo diet, which is rooted in whole foods and nutritionally dense ingredients. Here's how the chef-athlete gives a healthy, classic meat-and-vegetable combo an unexpected Southeast Asian flavor twist.
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 pounds brussels sprouts, stems trimmed
  • 1 pork tenderloin (1 1/4 lbs.), trimmed
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper, divided
  • 5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 pound sweet potatoes, cut into 3/4- by 4-in. wedges
  • 1 small red onion, cut into 1/2-in. wedges
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 Thai chiles or 1 serrano chile, minced
  • 3/4 cup roughly chopped cilantro, divided
  • Calories from fat: 38%
  • Protein: 37g
  • Fat: 23g
  • Saturated fat: 4.3g
  • Carbohydrate: 48g
  • Fiber: 8.9g
  • Sodium: 871mg
  • Cholesterol: 92mg

Preparation

  1. 1. Preheat oven to 450°. Separate brussels sprout leaves; thinly slice hearts. Set aside.
  2. 2. Season pork with 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Brown in 1 tbsp. oil in a large frying pan over high heat, turning, 8 to 10 minutes.
  3. 3. Toss sweet potatoes in a roasting pan with onion, 2 tbsp. oil, and 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Add pork. Roast 15 to 20 minutes for medium-rare, stirring vegetables once.
  4. 4. Meanwhile, purée honey, lime juice, fish sauce, garlic, ginger, and half the chile in a blender. Stir in remaining chile; set sauce aside.
  5. 5. Heat 1 tbsp. oil in the frying pan over high heat and lightly char half the brussels sprouts, stirring, 2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Repeat for remaining brussels sprouts. Toss with 1/2 cup cilantro and 1/4 cup sauce.
  6. 6. Slice pork, toss sweet potatoes with remaining cilantro, and set on a platter with brussels sprouts. Drizzle more sauce to taste over everything (you may have some left over).


Blue Cheese, Mustard and Beer Noodles

From Sunset Magazine, Feb 2013.  Maybe the all-time ultimate side dish for pork entrees.

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces wide egg noodles or pappardelle pasta
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3/4 cup chopped white onion
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup beer, at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 tablespoons roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley

Preparation

  1. 1. Cook noodles as package directs.
  2. 2. Meanwhile, melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook until soft, 8 minutes. Add garlic and cook another 2 minutes. Reduce heat to a simmer, then add mustard and beer.
  3. 3. Drain noodles and add to the pan; stir to coat. Add 1/4 cup blue cheese, stirring gently to combine, and season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle remaining 1/4 cup blue cheese and the parsley on top.


Incredible duck recipe in "The Week" Magazine.  By the way this week's ducks are the nicest of the season, no kidding, lots of fresh ducks at Hillsdale this week, just one more week of poultry season at Kookoolan Farms.  Have you considered a roast duck for Thanksgiving?

Roast duck: A New Orleans take on a Chinatown specialty

This Southern-style roast duck gets its own sweet-salty depth from a 24-hour bath in a sugary tea brine.

posted on October 17, 2012, at 2:26 PM

Down South, “people take their meat very seriously,” said Allison Vines-Rushing and Slade Rushing in Southern Comfort (Ten Speed Press). When we serve duck at MiLa, our restaurant in New Orleans, that local passion is an inspiration, even though we add a bit of New York flavor.
 
The New York influence is subtle. When we worked as chefs in Manhattan, we often spent date nights dining on Peking duck in Chinatown. Our Southern-style roast duck gets its own sweet-salty depth from a 24-hour bath in a sugary tea brine.
 
Recipe of the week
 
Sweet-tea-roasted duck in date sauce
 
For brine:

 •8 cups freshly brewed black tea
 •8 cups ice water
 •1 cup sugar
 •½ cup kosher salt
 •1½ tsp black peppercorns
 •1½ tsp red pepper flakes
 •4 cloves garlic, crushed
 •2 shallots, thinly sliced
 •Sprig each of thyme, sage, and rosemary
 •2 bay leaves
 •¼ tsp cayenne pepper
 
For the roast:

 •One 4-lb Muscovy duck (neck saved, innards removed and discarded)
 •4 shallots
 •2 heads garlic, halved
 •2 carrots, cut in 1-inch dice
 •2 stalks celery, cut in 1-inch dice
 •1 bay leaf
 •2 sprigs thyme
 •Sprig each of rosemary and sage
 •1 cup red wine
 •¼ cup brandy
 •4 cups chicken stock
 •¼ tsp fine sea salt
 •6 Medjool dates, pitted
 •2 tbsp champagne vinegar
 •1 tbsp unsalted butter
 
Combine all brine ingredients in a stockpot and add the duck. Weight it down with a plate, as the duck must be fully submerged. Refrigerate for 24 hours.
 
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove duck from the brine and place in a roasting pan with the neck, shallots, garlic, carrots, celery, bay leaf, thyme, rosemary, and sage. Season duck inside and out with black pepper.
 
Roast duck about 1½ to 2 hours, until a thermometer inserted into the thick part of the thigh reads 175 degrees. Remove duck from pan (reserving vegetables and drippings) and cool 30 minutes.
 
To make sauce, place roasting pan over a burner on medium heat. Deglaze the pan with the red wine and brandy. Using
 a wooden spoon, scrape bottom of pan to release caramelized bits. Cook until the liquid has reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Add stock and cook for 10 more minutes. Remove vegetables, herbs, and duck neck from the sauce and discard. Strain pan sauce through a sieve into a blender; add the salt, dates, vinegar, and butter. Puree until the sauce is smooth and reserve.
 
Carve the duck and arrange on a platter. Spoon the date sauce on top. Serves 4.

BASIC ROAST CHICKEN RECIPE

Grass-fed poultry is firmer and leaner than battery-raised poultry.  For best flavor and texture, turn down the heat and cook covered.    
1.      
“Farmer CZ” likes to brine her chickens first by combining 3 Tbsp salt with ½ gallon of water, and aromatics such as a drop of lavender oil, lemon oil, herbs, and/or fresh black pepper, and 1 to 4 Tbsp of an acid such as vinegar or wine.  In a bowl or ZiplockTM bag, cover the chicken and refrigerate at least 2 hours or up to 2 days.
2.      
Pat the chicken dry, rub the inside with salt and pepper. Stuff if desired.
3
.      
Place chicken in a covered roasting pan, or soaked clay pot, or cover your pan with foil.
4.       
Bake, covered, at 325°F.  A 4-lb chicken takes about 90 minutes; 5- to 6-pound chickens can take 2 hours.  When thermometer inserted between thigh and body reads 180°F or juices run clear, the chicken is thoroughly cooked.  For crisp, golden skin, remove the cover, brush the chicken with oil or butter, increase the temperature to 400°F and bake or broil for ten additional minutes.  Remove from oven, and allow to rest 5-10 min. before cutting.

When you buy 1/2 pig, one of the luscioius parts you get is bacon. Most of the bacon comes in those tidy rectangular sheets you're so famliar with at the grocery store, but you get the "bacon ends" too. What to do with those odd-size bits and pieces of bacon AKA meat candy? Here follow two great ideas: a light meal and a heavy one.


Pork Brisket with Sweet Cherry Bourbon Sauce, Caramelized Onions, Brie and Arugula. 
"This recipe originated at The Third Street Grill in McMinnville 15 years ago.  I have added the caramelized onions, brie and arugula and made it an open-faced sandwich served on a baguette." -- Caroline Hamina. 

Recommended wine pairing:  Biggio Hamina 2008 Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley.  Although I also have to say that I think Kookoolan World Meadery's Port-strength, Bourbon-barrel-aged mead (coming in August) is going to be gorgeous with this recipe as well.

This recipe ran recently in The Oregon Wine Press.  I'm inspired to do this because:  onions, arugula and cherries are so in season (well, cherries are *almost* in season...); because I'm really into Bourbon all of a sudden since the Bourbon barrel adventure this week in our meadmaking; and because I'm super-enthusiastic about the terrific quality of our Red Wattles heritage breed, pasture-raised, pork right now.  We have pigs available for purchase that will be killed the first of June and returned to you as finished meat about the third week of June -- just in time for cherry season.  (You can buy wonderful local organic dried cherries from Cherry Country at the Hillsdale Farmer's Market.)

2 sweet onions
2 lbs pork brisket or tenderloin (1/2 pound per person -- we recommend Red Wattles heritage breed pasture-raised pork from Kookoolan Farms!)
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
1/8 cup dried sweet cherries
2 oz. Bourbon
1/2 cup chicken stock (from Kookoolan Farms chickens of course!)
2 Tbsp cold butter
salt and pepper, to taste
2 Tbsp olive oil
1/3rd baguette, sliced in half (try the breads from Carlton Bakery!)
8 oz. Brie (2 oz per person)
carmelized onions
1-2 cups arugula (1/4 to 1/2 cup per person)

In a medium saute pan over low heat, melt 1 Tbsp butter and add sliced onions.  Slowly saute until onions caramelize.  Set aside.  Preheat oven to 350 oF.  Heat a large saute pan over medium high heat and add olive oil.  Sear the brisket on all sides until a rich brown color, about 2 minutes on each side.  Remove pork from heat and finish in the oven until cooked through, 7 to 20 minutes depending on cut and size, until internal temperature is 155 oF.  Deglace the pan with Bourbon, then add cherries and chicken stock.  Reduce sauce; add cold butter slowly to emulsify sauce.  Warm the baguette and the caramelized onions.  Layer the baguette with onions, Brie and arugula.  Slice the pork and arrange on top of the arugula, then top with sauce.  Serves 4.


WILTED SPINACH SALAD WITH BACON DRESSING
The heated bacon d...ressing wilts the spinach leaves and gives this salad a wonderfully delicate flavor. ALL the ingredients are easy to find in spring.

Ingredients:
•10 to 12 ounces fresh spinach, washed and torn into bit-size pieces. Forget the bags of pre-washed baby spinach at the grocery store. Get real spinach from a real farmer at the farmer's market, it really does taste better. Recommended variety: Bloomsdale spinach, and get the full-size leaves with some body in them, not that Farmer Chrissie has strong opinions about spinach...
•1/4 cup minced red onion. Go for the fresh spring onions that are starting to show up in the farmer's markets.
• 5 to 6 radishes, thinly sliced, well they're only 28 days from planting the seed to harvesting, so this is always the first vegetable out of the ground in spring.
•2 hard-cooked eggs, 1 chopped, 1 sliced. Of course you'll want these to be Kookoolan Farms eggs from pasture-raised hens, but if you're reading me on Facebook, that's probably what you have in your refrigerator anyway.
•2 to 4 slices bacon. NOW: these don't have to be pretty slices, because you're going to chop them up anyway. Use the "ends" or bits and pieces.
•1 to 1 1/2 tablespoons bacon drippings (you'll render this when you cook the bacon)
•1 1/2 tbsp. sugar
•3 tbsp. vinegar, use Kookoolan Farms Kombucha Vinegar or best-quality balsamic
•1 tbsp. water
• 1/2 tsp. salt
•1/8 tsp. pepper

Preparation:

Place prepared spinach in a large bowl. Add onions and radishes. Refrigerate, tightly covered. Fry the bacon until crisp; remove to paper towel and set aside. In a small mason jar combine the rendered bacon fat drippings with sugar, vinegar, water, salt and pepper. Refrigerate all ingredients until just before serving. When ready to serve, heat the dressing (stovetop or microwave) until just boiling. Toss the chopped egg with the greens then pour the hot dressing over greens mixture; toss again lightly. Top with sliced egg and crumbled bacon.
Serves 6.


SHAWARMA LAMB WITH COUSCOUS SALAD
From Sunset Magazine Nov 2011
1 cup chicken broth (made from Kookoolan Farms chickens)
1 cup couscous
1 medium carrot, shredded
1/2 cup roughly chopped flat-leak parsley
1/4 cup olive oil, divided
zest and juice of 2 lemons, divided
1 large onion, thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1.5 pounds top round lamb steak (or substitute any other lamb steak cut), thinly sliced
2 tsp. ground cumin
1/2 tsp cayenne
1 tsp each kosher salt and black pepper
1/2 cup Greek yoghurt
1. Bring broth to a boil in a medium saucepan.  Add couscous, cover tightly, remove from heat, and let sit 5 minutes.  Uncover, fluff with a fork, and add carrot, parsley, 2 tbsp oil, and zest and juice of 1 lemon.  Cover and set aside.
2.  Cook onion in remaining 2 Tbsp of oil in a large frying pan over high heat until the edges are charred, 10 to 12 minutes.  Add garlic, lamb, cumin, cayenne, salt and pepper; cook, stirring, until lamb is cooked through and browned, about 10 more minutes.
3.  Divide couscous among 4 plates and top with the lamb mixture.  Mix yoghurt with remaining lemon zest and juice, and serve with lamb.


WARM DATES WITH SOFT BLUE CHEESE AND PROSCIUTTO
If you need something brilliant to bring to a potluck, this is your ticket!  Make ahead, put in a covered frying pan, add a little oil and water, and warm the pan up at the host's house.  Ready to serve, QED.
1/2 cup loosely packed crumbled mild blue cheese
1/2 cup mascarpone or cream cheese
12 Medjool dates, halved and pitted
2 oz thinly sliced prosciutto (4 to 5 slices), cut into 24 thin ribbons
1 Tbsp olive oil
1.  Mash blue cheese and mascarpone in a bowl with a fork until smooth.  Fill each date cavity with a rounded 1/2 tsp of cheese.  Wrap each with a strip of prosciutto.
2.  Warm the oil and 1 Tbsp water in a medium nonstick frying pan over low heat.  Add the dates and cook, covered, until warmed through, about 3 minutes.  Serve warm.



BOEUF BOURGUIGNONNE
Why do the French need so many extra letters? It's just beef in burgundy wine!  Spelling aside, the French sure do know how to cook beautifully.  Don't be intimidated.  This is simple country cooking at its best.  When your freezer is full of Kookoolan Farms meats, you're ready to make a great meal any day.  Here's something for a dreary day off when you can lock yourself in the house all afternoon making.  As W.C. Fields once said, "I love cooking with wine.  Sometimes I even put it in the food!" (be sure to put a fire in the fireplace and buy an extra bottle of red wine for the cook).  Pure comfort food, stick-to-your-ribs warming, and fancy enough for company. Plan to devote half a day to its preparation.  It's really not  hard, but it takes some time.  Pull out a couple of packages of your grass-fed Kookoolan Farms beef stew meat and a package of bacon ends, and be sure to use pasta from Nonna's Noodles.  Nobody beats Julia Child's recipe.  But you can do a google search and find crock pot shortcuts that are pretty darn good too.  All you need is the beef stew, a pot of noodles and a bottle of red wine.  No other side dishes are necessary.



Easy 60-min Mozzarella

Equipment:
Large stock pot                 

Bowl for working curds

Rubber gloves

Two large spoons

Dairy thermometer

Ingredients:
Milk (non-homogenized)         
Citric Acid 
Lipase (if desired) 
Rennet 
Kosher or cheese salt 

 

Measure milk into non-aluminum pot. 
Dissolve 1 level tsp citric acid for each half gallon of milk used, in ½ c cool water.  Mix well into milk. (Use a minimum of ½ gal. milk for best results)
Add ¼ tsp lipase powder (to any amount of milk) if desired.  Stir until dissolved.
Heat milk in the pot over very low heat to a temperature of 90o-100o F. 
Dilute ¼ tsp liquid rennet for each half gallon of milk used in 1/3 c cool water.  Or crush ½ rennet tablet in a mortar and pestle, and dissolve in 1/3 c cool water.
Remove pot from heat element.  Stir in rennet solution and mix well for one minute or less.
Allow milk to set until a firm curd is achieved;  15 – 20 minutes.
Cut curd into 1 inch cubes and dump into a colander lined with wet cloth, set in the work bowl. 
Drain curd for 30 minutes, pouring off accumulated whey.
Meanwhile, wash milk pot and fill with water.  Heat to 165oF and maintain over very low heat.
Place drained curd, all or part if the batch is large, into the work bowl.  Dip about four cups of hot water into the bowl and knead the curd gently with the spoons or gloved hands. 
Pour cloudy water back into pot and dip more into the bowl.  Continue kneading until the curd begins to stretch when you lift it from the water by one edge.  Return water to pot and add fresh every 2 – 3 minutes.  Keep the pot of water hot over low heat. 
When the curd begins to stretch when lifted (very quickly if you use raw cow milk) add fresh hot water to the bowl and begin to shape your cheese with gloved hands. It may be kneaded into a round ball, separated into strands and braided or layered with basil leaves or thin slices of deli meat and rolled up like a jelly roll.  Play and have fun!   Refresh the hot water as needed.  If desired, sprinkle salt on the hot curd and knead it in. 
Chill fancy shapes in a bowl full of ice and water briefly to firm them up.  Alternatively, the  hot curd may be placed in a cup or bowl or any type of mold.  Cover and refrigerate until firm. 
Wrap firm cheese tightly and refrigerate until used.  If rolled with fresh herbs or meat, use within a few days. 




Kookoolan Farms Swedish Meatballs Recipe

Prep Time:  30 min; Cook Time:  25 min; total time: 55 minutes

Level:  Easy.  Serves:  approximately 30 meatballs, 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 slices fresh white bread (we used gluten-free white sandwich bread today)
  • 1/4 cup Kookoolan Farms milk
  • 3 tablespoons butter made from Kookoolan Farms cream, divided
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion grown at Kookoolan Farms
  • A pinch plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3/4 pound Kookoolan Farms pasture-raised ground beef
  • 3/4 pound Kookoolan Farms ground pork
  • 2 large Kookoolan Farms egg yolks
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour (we used gluten-free flour today)
  • 3 cups beef broth made from Kookoolan Farms beef
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream from Kookoolan Farms milk

Directions

Preheat oven to 200 degrees F.  Tear the bread into pieces and place in a small mixing bowl with the milk. Set aside.

In a 12-inch straight sided saute pan over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon butter. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and sweat until the onions are soft. Remove from the heat and set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the bread and milk mixture, ground beef, ground pork, egg yolks, 1 teaspoon of kosher salt, black pepper, allspice, nutmeg, and onions. Beat on medium speed for 1 to 2 minutes.

Using a scale or a cookie dough scoop, weigh meatballs into 1-ounce portions and place on a sheet pan. Using your hands, shape the meatballs into rounds.

Heat the remaining butter in the saute pan over medium-low heat, or in an electric skillet set to 250 degrees F. Add the meatballs and saute until golden brown on all sides, about 7 to 10 minutes. Remove the meatballs to an ovenproof dish using a slotted spoon and place in the warmed oven.  (Note:  up to this step, the meatballs may be prepared ahead of time, then kept in the refrigerator, up to two days in advance.)

Once all of the meatballs are cooked, decrease the skillet heat to low and add the flour. Whisk until lightly browned, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Gradually add the beef stock and whisk until sauce begins to thicken. Add the cream and continue to cook until the gravy reaches the desired consistency. Remove the meatballs from the oven, cover with the gravy and serve.

 





LAVENDER-BRINED, LAVENDER-ROASTED CHICKEN

Farmer Chrissie loves brining poultry to bring out its flavor!  Here is a great link with details about briningUsing the basic brine instructions in the link but adding 1/4th teaspoon of lavender essential oil, brine your whole Kookoolan Farms chicken for at least four hours.

1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1-2 teaspoons dried lavender
1 teaspoon dried thyme
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 large onion
1 (4-7 lb) Kookoolan Farms chicken, whole
1/4 cup dry vermouth
1/2 cup chicken stock
1-2 tablespoon flour

Fresh or dried lavender blossoms for edible garnish

In a small bowl or mortar and pestle coarsely crush lavender and thyme. Then stir together with butter, zest, salt and pepper until well combined. Spoon mixture onto a sheet of plastic wrap and form into a 4-inch log. Chill butter log until firm, at least 30 minutes, and up to 3 days.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Rinse chicken and pat dry. Slice herb butter and reserve 2 tablespoons for sauce. Slide hand under skin of chicken breast to loosen skin from meat. Insert about 3/4's of the butter under the skin and spread the rest over the outside of chicken. Truss chicken. Place the chicken in a flameproof roasting pan. Slice the onion into large pieces and scatter around the chicken. Roast bird in middle of oven until an instant-read thermometer inserted in thickest part of a thigh (be careful not to touch bone) registers 170° to 175°F. It will take roughly 55-65 minutes for a four pound chicken and 8 minutes more per every pound over that.

Lift chicken and tilt, emptying any juices from cavity into roasting pan. Remove the chicken to a platter, cover loosely with foil. Sauce: Add vermouth to pan. Place pan over high heat; bring vermouth to boil, scraping up any browned bits and onions. Strain the mixture into cup with pan juices. Spoon fat off and pour back into the pan. Add reserved 2 tablespoons herb butter and bring to a simmer - or melt butter before adding to pan. When butter has completely melted, add flour and whisk until smooth. Serve sauce with chicken.  Garnish with (edible!) lavender blossoms.

EGG RECIPES
Hollandaise Sauce
makes 1 cup
¾ cup unsalted butter
3 Tbsp. water
yolks of 3 farm eggs
juice of ½ a lemon (or to taste)
sea salt or kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste (use white
pepper if you don’t want flecks of pepper to show in your sauce)
• Melt the butter, then skim the froth from the surface with a spoon.
Let it cool until tepid.
• In a non-reactive saucepan (copper is ideal), whisk the water and egg
yolks with a little salt and pepper for 30 seconds, until thoroughly
combined and light in color.
• Set the pan over a low heat and whisk until the mixture is quite thick
(it will leave a ribbon trail for 5 seconds). This should take about 3
minutes. Take care that the base of the pot does not get too hot or
the eggs will scramble.
• Take the pan off the heat and whisk in the barely warm butter, a
tablespoon at a time, until the sauce thickens, then continue to whisk
while pouring in the butter in a slow, steady stream. Leave the milky
whey at the bottom of the pan.
• Stir in the lemon juice and season. The consistency should be light
enough to pour easily from a spoon. If it is too thick, add more water
or lemon juice.
Chef Kathryn Yeomans
The Farmer’s Feast
http://thefarmersfeast.wordpress.com


Egg Condiment
Mayonnaise with Fresh Herbs
makes 1 ½ cups
2 egg yolks
1 tsp. lemon juice (plus more to taste)
2 tsp. champagne vinegar (plus more to taste)
salt and pepper
1 tsp. Dijon mustard (optional)
1 Tbsp. water
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 cup vegetable or peanut oil
2-4 Tbsp. chopped soft herbs (such as parsley, chervil, tarragon and
chives, or omit the mustard and replace the herbs with ½ cup Douglas
Fir tips, chopped, for a seasonal Oregon mayonnaise)
• Combine the yolks, lemon juice, vinegar, salt and pepper, Dijon
mustard if using, and water in the bowl of a food processor. Turn on
to combine the ingredients thoroughly.
• Add the oil, little by little in a thin stream at first, until the emulsion
begins to form and the mayonnaise starts to thicken. Continue to add
the oil, a little more quickly, but still in a slow, thin stream. Adjust
seasonings, fold in herbs (do not process herbs).
note: mayonnaise can be made by hand by combining the ingredients in
a bowl rather than a processor, and whisking with a wire whisk. Whisk
rather frantically, adding the oil drop by drop in the beginning, gradually
increasing to a thin, steady stream.
Chef Kathryn Yeomans
The Farmer’s Feast
http://thefarmersfeast.wordpress.com


Sweet Eggs
Sweet Sabayon with Fresh Strawberries
serves 2-4
Simple & seasonal, this elegant dessert makes excellent use of ripe
strawberries and abundant market eggs.
yolks of 3 very fresh farm eggs
3 Tbsp. honey
3 Tbsp. Madeira
1 Tbsp. Cognac
fresh strawberries
• Put all of the ingredients in a bowl over a pan of barely simmering
water and beat with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Serve hot
over strawberries, or try it over other fresh seasonal fruit, such as
peaches, raspberries, or poached pears.
Chef Kathryn Yeomans
The Farmer’s Feast
http://thefarmersfeast.wordpress.com


La Stracciatella
Roman Eggdrop Soup with Spinach
makes 2 quarts
Substitute spring peas, summer zucchini, or autumn mushrooms for the
spinach. This soup has the charm of being both rich and light, is easily
digestible, and is a wonderful restorative.
8 cups rich, well seasoned homemade meat broth
2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
3 fresh farm eggs
¼ cup breadcrumbs
¼ cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
grated zest of 1 lemon
a tiny grating of nutmeg
salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
¼ pound spinach, chopped
4 Tbsp. chopped Italian flat leaf parsley
Bring the broth to a boil.
Meanwhile, prepare the egg mixture. Combine the eggs with the
breadcrumbs, Parmigiano Reggiano, lemon zest, and nutmeg. Season
with salt and pepper.
The broth should be steadily, but not rapidly, boiling. Gently whisk in
the egg mixture a spoonful at a time (do not over whisk, as this will break
up the strands of egg mixture too much). Add the chopped spinach and
let the soup cook for 1 minute. Stir in the parsley, adjust seasonings
and serve hot.
Chef Kathryn Yeomans
The Farmer’s Feast
http://thefarmersfeast.wordpress.com

Savory Seared Grits
with Sautéed Greens and a Poached Farm Egg
serves 4
For a savory breakfast, serve cornmeal grits fresh out of the pot, creamy
and smooth, with sautéed seasonal greens and a poached farm egg. Or
make up a batch of grits the night before, or even a day or two ahead,
and pour the mixture into an oiled loaf pan. When cool, you can slice
and sear the grit-cake in a skillet, or put a slice in the toaster oven and
warm through. Top it with whatever looks good in the fridge; sautéed
peppers, caramelized onions, roasted mushrooms, or even cooked beans
and salsa.
For the grits:
2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
2 tsp. kosher or sea salt
1 bay leaf
1 cup yellow cornmeal, medium-grind
1 ½ Tbsp. nutritional yeast, or to taste
freshly ground black pepper
For the greens:
2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, peeled & thinly sliced
a pinch of chile flake
1 pound spinach, kale, or Swiss chard, cleaned and cut into thick
ribbons
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
For the egg:
4 very fresh free-range farm eggs, at room temperature
2 tsp. distilled white vinegar
pinch of sea salt
Prepare the grits. Bring 5 cups of water, the olive oil, salt, and bay leaf
to a boil. Whisking vigorously with one hand, sift the cornmeal into the
water in a thin, steady stream. Keep whisking until the cornmeal is
thoroughly incorporated and the mixture is smooth. Reduce the heat to
medium-low, and bring gradually to a boil (this will take about 5
minutes), stirring frequently and thoroughly with a wooden spoon. When
the grits begin to bubble, lower the heat so that there is a continuous but
slow perking, and partially cover the pot. Cook for 30-40 more minutes,
stirring frequently, and working cautiously around the hot bubbling pot.
When the grits are done, they will be creamy, thick, and glossy.
Season the cooked grits with the nutritional yeast, and freshly ground
black pepper. Serve hot, or pour into a lightly greased loaf pan and allow
to cool to room temperature. Refrigerate the loaf until cool and firm
(ideally overnight), then slice and heat as needed.
To prepare the greens, put the olive oil, garlic, and chile flake in a wide
skillet and warm over a medium flame. When the garlic just starts to
sizzle, add the greens, along with a pinch of salt and freshly ground
pepper. Toss and stir the greens, and continue to cook and stir until the
greens are tender. Serve over grits along with a poached farm egg.
Poach the egg: Crack the eggs into 4 small bowls or ramekins. Fill a
large skillet with water about 2 inches deep and bring to a boil. Add the
vinegar and salt and reduce the heat to a simmer.
Slide the eggs into the water one at a time and poach for 2-3 minutes,
until the whites set and a thin, translucent film forms over the yolks.
Using a slotted spoon, remove the eggs from the poaching water and set
them over the plated grits & greens. Serve at once.
Chef Kathryn Yeomans
The Farmer’s Feast
http://thefarmersfeast.wordpress.com


Spaetzle with Cabbage, Bacon, and Onions
Pork recipes do not have to be heavy on meat.  This one just uses a little.  Inspired by a recipe in Bon Appetit Cookbook.  Can be made with butter or any oil substituted for the bacon if you prefer a vegetarian option.
4 slices thick-cut bacon
4 oz dry spaetzle
1 large yellow onion, peeled, halved lengthwise, and thinly sliced
1.5 tsp salt, divided
8 oz thinly sliced green cabbage or 4 oz each sliced cabbage and sliced kale (tough stems removed)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar or Kookoolan Farms Kombucha Vinegar
1 tsp caraway seeds
1/4 tsp black pepper

1.  Cook bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until risp.  Remove bacon and set aside to cool.  Pou off the rendered bacon fat, reserving 2 Tbsp in the pan.  Crumble or chop the bacon.
2.  Cook spaetzle in boiling salted water until almost completely tender.  There should still be some bite to it.  (It will finish cooking later when added to the rest of the ingredients.)  Drain the spaetzle, reserving 1/4 cup of the cooking water.
3.  Add the onions to the hot bacon fat.  Att 1 tsp salt and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes, or until onions are soft and beginning to brown, stirring frequently.
4.  Add cabbage and continue to cook until tender.
5.  Add bacon and spaetzle and cook until heated through.
Serve with rye bread, or crusty french bread.


Espresso Stout-braised Pork Shoulder
The flavors of beer and coffee combine to create an earthy sauce, perfect for coating shredded pork shoulder.  Serve the meat in sandwiches or piled atop mashed potatoes with a pint of stout on the side.
3 lbs bone-in pork shoulder blade roast (recommended: Kookoolan Farms Red Wattles heritage breed pork!)
fine sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
5 cups espresso stout
1/3 cup packed dark brown sugar
3 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1.  Rub the pork with the salt and pepper.  Heat the oil in a large lidded pot over medium-high heat and brown the meat on all sides.  Remove the pork from the pot.
2.  Add the onion to the pot and cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, about 5 minutes.  Stir in the stout, sugar, and balsamic vinegar and bring to a simmer over high heat.
3.  Reduce the heat to low and return the pork to the pot.  over the pot with a tight-fitting lid and simmer until the meat is fork-tender and easily pulls away from the bone, about 3 hours.
4.  Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 oF.  Remove the pork from the pot and place it in a large baking dish.  Bake until lightly browned, about 20 minutes.
5.  While the pork browns, place a large strainer over a large bowl and pass the contents of the pot through the strainer, discarding the solids.  Bring the liquid to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat until it has reduced by half and has a consistency similar to barbeque sauce.
6.  Remove the pork from the oven and shred it into large pieces using two forks.  Discard any large pieces of fat.  Ladle the sauce over the shredded pork (you may not need all of it -- serve extra sauce on the side) and toss gently to coat the meat.  Serve immediately.


KEVIN GIBSON'S DUCK BREAST WITH PERSIMMONS
Persimmons are a fall fruit.  Save this recipe for autumn.  Serves 2.
2 tsp whole coriander seed
1/2 cinnamon stick
1/2 tsp salt
1 duck breast (preferably Kookoolan Farms Pekin duck -- call or email ahead to ask us to quarter one for you; confit the legs separately, see confit recipe on this page)
2 rips fuyu persimmons
2 handfuls arugula, dressed with a simple vinaigrette
1.  Grind together coriander, cinnamon, and peppercorns, and mix with salt.
2.  Score the skin of the duck breast, and rub in the spice mixture.
3.  Refrigerate duck breast for a few hours to allow the spices to permeate -- allow to come to room temperature before cooking.
4.  Heat a dry saute pan over a low flame, and cook gently until the color just begins to change above the skin and the meat has the beginnings of structure but hasn't quite become firm, about 10 minutes.  (The goal is to crisp the skin but keep the top rare.)
5.  Spoon off the excess as fat renders out.
6.  Turn meat over and cook for just 30 seconds on the flip side.
7.  Remove from heat and let rest 5 minutes.
8.  Peel the persimmons, removing cores, and cut into wedges while the duck rests.
10.  Plate the duck with the persimmons over a bed of arugula.


Braised Venison Shoulder Roast

1 2-1/2 to 3 pound boneless venison shoulder roast, tied  (bone-in should work as well; should also be tied)
Extra virgin olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 medium carrot, peeled and chopped
1 celery stalk, chopped
2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1/2 cup canned tomatoes, chopped
1 apple, any type, cored and chopped
1/2 oz. dried porcini or chanterelle mushrooms
1 cup beef broth
1/2 cup apple juice
1/2 cup red wine
Fresh thyme, chopped
Fresh rosemary, chopped
2 bay leaves
Salt and freshly-ground pepper, to taste

1.       Pre-heat oven to 300.

2.      Season venison with salt and pepper. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium high heat and brown venison on all sides.

3.      Remove venison to a plate, reduce heat to medium, and add onion, carrot, and celery. Saute until vegetables have become mahogany in color, stirring occasionally. Add garlic, saute briefly.

4.      Add red wine and deglaze pan, then add tomato, apple, and dried mushroom.

5.      Let mixture come to a boil before stirring in beef broth and apple juice. Bring to a boil again, then add thyme, rosemary, bay leaves, venison and any juices that have collected on plate.

6.      Cover roast with parchment paper, pressing it down so that it almost touches the meat and the edges extend about an inch over the sides of the pot. Cover tightly and place in oven. After 1 hour, turn roast. Continue braising for a total of about 2 hours, or until meat is fork tender (if bone-in, until meat pulls away from bone).

7.           Remove roast to carving board or serving platter and cover loosely with foil.

8.      Run braising liquid through food mill into sauce pan. Taste and add salt and pepper as needed. Bring liquid to a boil over medium heat and reduce to desired consistency.



Guinea Hen, or Faraona in Italian; Pintard in French; Pintada in Spanish) is a lovely, rich-flavored game bird about the same size as a chcicken.  Kookoolan Farms generally offers these about once a year.  This recipe is from our good friends Richard White and Charlene Murdoch.

  I received this from Debra Lynn Dadd's e-newsletter.  She served this with swiss chard, chopped and sauteed in a bit of butter with a sprinkling of nutmeg.  It was a perfect autumn meal for a rainy evening.  makes 4 servings


FARAONA AL SUCCO D’UVA

(Roasted Guinea Hen with Grape Juice)


Ingredients:

            1 Guinea hen, well cleaned and dry

            1 onion, medium chop

            1 carrot, medium chop

            I stalk of celery, medium chop

            Extra virgin olive oil

            4 cups white grape must (don’t know why you couldn’t use red)

            5 leaves of sage

            1 handful of herbs such as rosemary & sage

            several cloves of garlic

            1 Tbsp butter

            1 Tbsp flour

            salt & pepper

 

First, prepare sale herbe, a mixture of ½ sea salt and ½ a mixture of equal parts black pepper, finely chopped rosemary & sage and finely chopped garlic.  Make about a cup.  It’s a fabulous, all purpose seasoning, great on roasted potatoes, too.

 

Method:

 

1.                  Cut a deep slit (3/4” wide) in each side of the hen between the breast & thigh joint.  Stuff 1 tablespoon of sale herbe into each slit.

2.                  Put sage leaves and 1-2 tablespoons of sales herbe in the hen’s cavity.  Try to coat cavity generously.

3.                  Place the chopped vegetables in a baking pan and the Guinea hen on top.  Pour about ½ cup of olive oil (or more) over all.  Season with salt and pepper.

4.                  Cook in a preheated 350 degree oven for about 90 minutes.  Remove the hen from the oven and increase the temperature to 425 degrees. Then add 3 cups of grape juice, poured over hen, and cook until hen is crispy.

5.                  Remove the hen from the pan and deglaze the pan with another cup of grape juice (or more if necessary).  Make a buerre mane (equal parts butter & flour as a paste) and add to sauce a little at a time to thicken.

6.                  Cut the Guinea hen and serve with sauce ladled over or on the side.

 

Serves 4

 

What a way to showcase our region’s grapes!

 

Sauteed Rabbit with Cherry Beer and Dried Cherries, from "Everybody Eats Well in Belgium Cookbook" by Ruth Van Waerebeek
Sauteed Rabbit with Cherry Beer and Dried Cherries, a recipe created for a beer-tasting dinner at the James Beard House.  The secret of the sauce lies in the lambic kriek beer, a spontaneously fermented ale, original to Belgium, made from wheat, malter barley, and fresh black cherries, which impart their color and flavor.  It is brewed according to la methode champenoise, and the final product has the refinement, bubbles, and elegance of a great Champagne.  I like to serve the dish with wild rice, Belgian endives, and a casserole of wild mushrooms.  The accompanying beverage should certainly be kriek beer served in champagne glasses.  Buy three times the amount of beer called for in the recipe:  to drink during cooking, to cook with, and to serve with the meal!

3 Tbsp unsalted butter
1 whole rabbit, split or butterflied, boned if you're ambitious but OK to skip that
salt and pepper to taste
2 Tbsp finely diced carrot
2 Tbsp finely diced celery
2 Tbsp finely diced onion
1 Tbsp all-purpose flour
1 bottle (12 oz) cherry kriek lambic beer
2 Tbsp red currant jelly (visit Ayers Creek Farm's booth for this)
2 Tbsp dried cherries or cranberries (visit Cherry Country farm's booth for this)

1.  Melt butter in a heavy skillet until it foams.  Season the rabbit with salt and pepper, add it to the skillet, and sautee until browned on both sides and medium rare, about 10 minutes.  Do not overcook or the rabbit will be tough.  Remove meat to a warmed platter and set aside.
2.  Add any rabbit bones to the skillet if you have chosen to bone the rabbit; brown them for a few minutes being careful not to burn the butter.  Add the vegetables, stirring constantly, until vegetables have browned slightly.
3.  Sprinkle flour over the vegetables; cooking, stirring, until the flour is absorbed, about 1 minute.  Deglaze with beer, scraping up all the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, and boil for 1 minute.  Add the red currant jelly and stir until dissolved.
4.  Reduce the sauce by half over medium heat, 5 to 6 minutes.  Pour through a strainer and return the sauce to the skillet (Chrissie sometimes skips the straining).  Add the cherries and simmer 10 minutes. Swirl 1 Tbsp additional butter into the sauce; return the meat to the skillet and reheat quickly in the sauce.  Taste and adjust the salt and pepper, and serve at once.


Pheasant with Leek and Pecan Stuffing, from "The Silver Palate Cookbook" by Julee Russo and Sheila Lukins -- Chrissie's favorite way to prepare pheasant, guinea hen, and Red Bourbon turkey.  Chrissie and Koorosh agree:  Red Bourbon heritage breed turkey is the best poultry of any kind either of us has ever had, bar none.  It's not just for Thanksgiving.

This is hands-down the best poultry stuffing I've ever had.  It takes some work, so whever I make this recipe, I make a double-batch of the stuffing, and freeze it in ziplock bags before wetting it with broth.  Later when I want to roast something small and simple like a chicken or guinea hens, I just pull the ziplock out of the freezer, pour hot broth over the stuffing, stuff my bird, and roast.

On an amusing sidenote, the recipe is prefaced this way in the cookbook:  "We think pheasant is one of the most delicious of the domestically raised game birds available to us.  It is rich and meaty, with a firm texture no longer found in chicken.  If care is taken during roasting, the meat is moist and succulent."  Of course our customers know that you can in fact still get Real Chicken, and this recipe works great with chicken too.  And guinea hen.  And almost any game bird.

2 pheasants or guinea hens, or one large roasting chicken, or a Red Bourbon Turkey
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 cup finely chopped yellow onion
1 large carrot, peeled and finely chopped
2 tbsp plus 1 tsp dried marjoram, or 2 cups fresh in season
1/4 tsp dried thyme, or 1 tbsp fresh in season
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs Italian parsley
3 cups chicken stock (of course make your own from Kookoolan Farms feet and necks, don't buy canned)
12 Tbsp (1.5 sticks) sweet butter
10 medium-sized leeks, white part only, well cleaned and thinly sliced
6 cups crumbs from good-quality white or wheat bread
2 cups toasted pecans
1 cup finely chopped Italian parsley
4 slices of pancetta, 4 oz total (bacon can be substituted, but pancetta really tastes different and better! -- buy the most expensive pancetta at Viande Meats inside Pastaworks/City Market in northwest Portland, it really does make a difference in this recipe!)
1/2 cup heavy cream

1.  Rinse poultry inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels.  If organs are available, chop neck, heart and gizzard but save the liver for another use.
2.  heat oil in a small saucepan.  Brown neck and giblets well, turning frequently.  Add onion, carrot, and 1 tsp marjoram.  Reduce heat to low and cook covered undtil vegetables are tender, about 25 minutes.
3.  uncover, add thyme, bay, parsley, and stock, and season with a pinch of salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, for 45 minutes.  Strain the stock, discarding the solids, and reserve.
4.  melt the butter in a skillet.  stir in the sliced leeks and cook covered over low heat about 30 minutes until very tender.
5.  toss the leeks and their butter with the bread crumbs, pecans, chopped parsley, and remaining marjoram.  Season lightly with salt and generously with pepper, and toss again.  (NOTE:  at this point you can freeze part of the stuffing for later convenience.)  If the stuffing seems dry, moisten it with the reserved broth.
6.  preheat the oven to 375 F.
7.  Stuff your poultry, truss if necessary, and drape the breasts with pancetta.  Set the birds in a roasting pan.
8. set the roasting pan in the middle of the oven and roast until done, basting occasionally with the fat and juices that accumulate.  Chrissie likes to test smaller birds by pricking the thigh to check that the juices are clear; for turkeys, check the breast temperature.  When done, remove the birds from the pan, cover with foil, and keep warm while you make the gravy.
9.  Pour excess fat out of the pan (of course reserve it for later sauteeing of vegetables and potatoes).  Pour reserved stock and heavy cream into the pan, and set over medium heat.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, sturring and scraping up any browned bits, until sauce is reduced by about one third.  Taste and correct seasoning with salt and pepper, and morethyme if desired.
10. Carve birds, arrange the meat on a platter, mound the stuffing in the center of the platter, and drizzle the meat and stuffing with the sauce.  Serve immediately, passing the remaining sauce in a boat.

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CIDERHOUSE APPLE CHICKEN

2 1/2 lbs chicken with bones (quartered chickens work well)
salt and pepper
2 tablespoons butter
1 cup good quality, fresh apple cider
2 cloves garlic
2 medium yellow onions
1 medium green apple
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/2 cup cream
fresh parsley
 
1. If you are using chicken breasts, cut them into large chunks, about 2"x2". If you are using pieces, leave wings and legs whole and cut breasts into three pieces. Season with salt and pepper.
2. Melt the butter in your largest skillet, and lay out the pieces of chicken in a single layer. If they don't all fit, do this in batches. On high heat, cook until brown on both sides.
3. Pour the cider into the pan, and finely grate in the garlic cloves (if you don't have a fine grater like a microplane, you can also use a garlic press or chop very fine).
4. Slice the onions and apple (leave skin on but remove core) and lay slices on top of the chicken.
5. Cover and simmer for 45 minutes.
6. Remove chicken, apples, and onions from pan into a bowl, and cover to keep warm. Add mustard and cream to pan juices. Cook for a few minutes on high heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens. Add chicken, apples, and onions back into the pan and stir to coat with sauce.
7. Serve to warm dishes and sprinkle with parsley.

 

JACKIE BESSLER'S HASENPFEFFER
(German Peppered Hare/Rabbit)

This is the recipe I used for the rabbit we bought from you awhile back.  It was delicious.  I think the only thing I’d add would be fresh mushrooms, in season.  We served this with wild rice and a fresh salad from Growing Wild Farm. 2 ½ pounds of rabbit (up to 3#), cut up
2 cups Pinot Noir
1 tablespoons good quality wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar (with the mother)
1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 teaspoon whole cloves
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 bay leaves

Place cut-up rabbit in flat refrigerator container.  In bowl, combine remaining ingredients; pour over rabbit.  Marinate overnight in refrigerator.  Place marinated rabbit in crock pot.  Add 1 ½ cups marinade, cover and cook on low for 8 to 10 hours.  Remove meat to warm platter.  Thicken gravy, if desired.  Serves 4.

 

Confit of Duck or Goose

Here is an easy step by step way to successfully prepare confit of duck with ideas for variations. Ingredients
Curing

  • 4 legs of duck, or a whole goose or duck, cut into eight pieces
  • 2 tbsp. sea salt
  • 1 rosemary stalk
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 juniper berries
  • 1 garlic clove

     

To Cook

500-600g (1 lb) duck or goose or chicken fat, or lard

  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 rosemary stem
  • 1 bay leaf

     

Method

To Cure: Rub the salt into the duck legs and place in a container with the garlic, rosemary, bay leaf and juniper berries. Cover and leave in the refrigerator for 24 hours. Remove the duck from the refrigerator and lightly wash off all the salt and pat dry the duck or brush off all the salt.

To Cook: Place the duck fat in a pan which is large enough to hold the fat and duck legs, with a heat proof lid. Over a moderately low heat melt the duck fat. Add the garlic, rosemary, bay leaf and the duck legs. The fat should totally cover the duck. Cover the pan and cook slowly on the stove or in the oven at the lowest setting (it is best to cook in the oven if your stove doesn't have a very low heat). Cook the duck legs for 2 hours then remove from the oven and allow to cool.

To Store:
Remove the duck from the fat and place in a jar or container. Strain the fat through a muslin and pour it over the duck so that it is totally covered, be careful not to pour in any of the duck stock that will be at the bottom you may set this aside to use for a sauce. Seal the container well and refrigerate until ready to cook. The duck can be eaten straight away if necessary but it is best left for at least one week to allow the flavours to develop.  Keeps well for months if kept cool and dry, and if each time you remove a piece of meat you make sure what remains is well covered in fat.  

 

Suggestions for use

A piece of confit, sautéed briefly, in which new potatoes and perhaps a truffle are then sautéed.
Porcini or other wild mushrooms, sautéed with a bit of confit,
Fall cabbage sautéed in confit.


Roasted Wild Goose
(or duck, or teal, or other waterfowl)
From Kookoolan Farms customer and neighbor, Ursula Bessler

Wild waterfowl can easily start tasting oily, so it should be prepared fresh.  Take out the fat gland in the back or cut off the tail.  An optional additional step is to skin the goose and then to dip it into hot water to remove the rest of the fat.  Marinade for 2-3 days.

Marinade: 1 clove, 4  crushed juniper berries, 1/2 teaspoon crushed peppercorns, 1 bay leaf, 1 twig thyme, 1 onion cut into slices, chopped  parsley, 2 parts red wine, 1 part vinegar, 1 part water, or red wine only.  The meat should be completely covered by the marinade.  The best way is to marinade the meat in a freezer bag, and put the bag into a container, that way you won't
need so much liquid.  Put the container in a cold place and turn daily.

Cooking:
Place inside the goose:  1 apple, 1 onion, both quartered; some sprigs of parsley, thyme, sage, 1 bayleaf.  Put the goose on a rack into a roasting pan, breast down.  Pour hot broth
(about 1 inch) into the pan.  Then cook the goose in a pre-heated 400 F oven for 30 minutes.  Then turn oven down to 350F, turn goose breast side up and cover top with sliced bacon.  (The smoked bacon-flavor goes well with the flavor of wild game). Then roast about 20 to 30 minutes per pound.  It is important to pour broth over the goose often, but carefully without dislodging the bacon.  The inside temperature should be 180 F.  Do not roast too long, as the meat will get dry and will lose its flavor. 

When the goose is done, turn off oven and let goose rest in the oven for 15 minutes.

If you use wine only, or if your marinade does not taste too vinegary, you can use part of it with chicken broth to baste the goose and for gravy.   

Guten Appetit! 

 

Lavender Lemon Chicken

1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1-2 teaspoons dried lavender
1 teaspoon dried thyme
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon lemon zest
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 large onion
1 (4-7 lb) Kookoolan Farms chicken, whole
1/4 cup dry vermouth
1/2 cup chicken stock
1-2 tablespoon flour

In a small bowl or mortar and pestle coarsely crush lavender and thyme. Then stir together with butter, zest, salt and pepper until well combined. Spoon mixture onto a sheet of plastic wrap and form into a 4-inch log. Chill butter log until firm, at least 30 minutes, and up to 3 days.

Preheat oven to 400°F. Rinse chicken and pat dry. Slice herb butter and reserve 2 tablespoons for sauce. Slide hand under skin of chicken breast to loosen skin from meat. Insert about 3/4's of the butter under the skin and spread the rest over the outside of chicken. Truss chicken. Place the chicken in a flameproof roasting pan. Slice the onion into large pieces and scatter around the chicken. Roast bird in middle of oven until an instant-read thermometer inserted in thickest part of a thigh (be careful not to touch bone) registers 170° to 175°F. It will take roughly 55-65 minutes for a four pound chicken and 8 minutes more per every pound over that.

Lift chicken and tilt, emptying any juices from cavity into roasting pan. Remove the chicken to a platter, cover loosely with foil. Sauce: Add vermouth to pan. Place pan over high heat; bring vermouth to boil, scraping up any browned bits and onions. Strain the mixture into cup with pan juices. Spoon fat off and pour back into the pan. Add reserved 2 tablespoons herb butter and bring to a simmer - or melt butter before adding to pan. When butter has completely melted,add flour and whisk until smooth. Serve sauce with chicken.


Kookoolan Farms Moroccan-Style Grilled Poultry
This was originally a recipe for game hens, so the overnight marinade works great with the firmer texture and meatier flavor outdoor-raised poultry and gourmet game birds.  The Moroccan spices are great for summer barbeques. 

This is a grill dinner your family and guests will talk about for years.  The combination of herbs, spices, and peanut oil really brings out the bird’s natural flavors.  Free-range or wild poultry will stand up to the long marinade far better than confinement-raised birds.  Works great with chicken, pheasant, guinea hens, Cornish game hens, or squabs.  For wilder-raised birds, which tend to be much leaner than confinement-raised birds, turn down the temperature of your grill to medium or medium-high, and cook a little more slowly, in order to avoid drying them out.  Their leaner flesh tends toward toughness when cooked at higher temperatures.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 small birds (3 pounds or less), halved lengthwise; or one large bird (4 lbs), quartered, for each 4 persons.
  • 1/4 cup peanut oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon paprika
  • 2 teaspoons allspice
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • 2 teaspoons grated ginger
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • olive oil

    PREPARATION:

    Combine all marinade ingredients in a small bowl. Place poultry in a large ziplock bag, pour in the marinade, press out the air and seal.  Marinate in the refrigerator at least 6 hours or up to 24 hours. Preheat grill for medium-high heat.  Place birds on the grill, breast side down, and discard the unused marinade.  Cook the poultry for 20 minutes, then turn and grill for an additional 30, or until juices run clear or internal temperature of the thigh reads between 175-180. Remove from grill, allow to rest for a few minutes and serve. 

     

SERVING: For a great middle-eastern-themed, outdoor BBQ dinner party, grill pita bread as well, and serve with hummus, baba ghanoush eggplant spread, yogurt-mint sauce, a salad of fresh cucumbers, parsley, and tomatoes, and rice.  Follow with a dessert of Baklava, sugared almonds, and Turkish coffee for a truly memorable evening.

 

Rabbit and Lemon Tagine                                                              

Ingredients :
1 rabbit, jointed
1
lemon
4
onions
4
cloves garlic
2 oz
butter
Salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh grated
ginger
1/2 teaspoon powdered
cumin
1 stick
cinnamon
2g
saffron (in stamens, not powdered)
1 bunch
parsley
1 bunch
coriander
Chicken stock

Recipe :
Peel and chop
onions, crush garlic and chop herbs.
Melt
butter in a large pan, brown meat.
Add
onions once rabbit is golden.
Cook for a few more minutes, then remove liver from heat.
Add
ginger, cumin, cinnamon, saffron and crushed garlic, then stir in 300ml stock.
Season.
Mix ingredients well, then leave to cook for 30 minutes.
Add up to 1 cup more stock if necessary during
cooking, to keep meat moist.
Add
juice of half a lemon, parsley and coriander.
Chop and add liver, leave to cook for a further 10 minutes.

Make
couscous:
Weigh out, then cover with boiling water or stock. Cover bowl and leave
couscous to absorb water, until light and fluffy. Melt in a knob of butter to taste.

Serve
couscous and meat together.


Advice :
This is a tasty dish, full of nutrients:
Rich in iron and potassium, rabbit meat also contains trace elements and minerals, essential for a healthy, balanced diet.
With more proteins than most meats, rabbit is especially good for children and teenagers.
Rabbit meat is also rich in vitamines B, PP, and E, which makes it great for anyone who does a lot of sport, or who wants to build muscle. Protein is also good for the nervous system and protects cells from ageing.
Lean and tender, rabbit meat is very easily digested.

Recommended wines:
- Bordeau: St Emilion
- Burgandy: Maçon, Saumur Champigny
- Rhone Valley: Tavel, Côtes de Provence

 


Sauteed Mushrooms and Wild Vegetables

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp Chicken fat (or butter). 

Small bunch of wild leeks or green onions

1 lb mixed wild/gourmet mushrooms

½ lb fiddlehead ferns, seabeans, and braising greens

2 TBSP demiglace

¼ cup sherry wine. 

¼ cup chevre cheese (or heavy cream).

1 tsp dried thyme

black pepper to taste

 


In a large sauté pan, melt a little chicken fat (or butter).  Saute leeks and mixed mushrooms.  If desired you can include some leftover lamb or chicken or some ground beef.  After about 3 minutes, add the rest of the vegetables.

After about 5-6 minutes, when vegetables have softened and are slightly brown, and any raw meat has cooked through, add 2 TBSP chicken demiglace and ¼ cup sherry wine. 

After about 1-2 minutes, when the sauce has thickened, add ¼ cup chevre cheese (or heavy cream).

 

Season with thyme and black pepper, and then serve the whole thing over polenta or pasta or couscous. 

 

Pairing: 

 

Choose a beverage with a rich strong taste and high in acid, such as a chardonnay or a big red wine or a Belgian beer, or with kombucha tea for a non-alcoholic choice.


Pasta in Brodo con Fegatini e Piselli

This recipe is provided by Anthony Boutard of Ayers Creek Farm:  From Italian Cooking, by Elizabeth David.

I first came across this minestra in Verona; it is one of the nicest pasta in brodo mixtures, mild, soothing and freshly flavoured.

The quantities for two people are a pint of chicken broth, 4 or 5 chicken livers, 6-8 oz. of shelled green peas, about 1-1/2 oz. fine pasta (it should be home-made, in short strips about the thickness of a match, but ready made pasta will do), Parmesan cheese, and a little butter.  

If using ready-made pasta, first cook it for 5 minutes, with the green peas, in plenty of boiling salted water.  Drain it, and then heat the broth to boiling point and put in the pasta and peas, which should be young and very fresh, so they will be cooked at the same time as the pasta.  Clean and chop the chicken livers, not too small.  Heat them through in the butter, and add them to the pasta and broth, with their butter.  Add some grated Parmesan cheese when the broth is ready to serve."

The recipe is provided verbatim.  Please note that the British Imperial pint is bigger than the US pint.

Stumptown Savoury's Thanksgiving Recipes for Kookoolan Farms heritage turkeys

Getting the most from your turkey or other poultry

Here are some tips for your Thanksgiving turkey, with thanks to New Seasons, Diestel, Betty Crocker, Cook's Illustrated, and the Silver Palate:

1.  Keep it cold.

Keep it cold until Thursday.  A refrigerator is ideal, but who has space in their refrigerator this time of year?  You may have a picnic cooler out in the garage.  Go wash it out with soap and then a bleach rinse so it's sterile, and then let the cooler “air out” for a few hours so it no longer smells like bleach.  You may even want to throw it in the car for bringing to the farmer's market.  Put the turkey in the cooler, and fill it with ice.  Voila, that's it, the turkey will be fine on your porch or in your garage until Thursday morning.

2.  Brining improves a good turkey!

For even better results, combine the above advice with brining.  Brining really brings out the flavor and moisture in a turkey.  Take the turkey out of its plastic bag and place it in the clean picnic cooler.  Pour ice all around it.  Separately, in a small saucepan, dissolve 1 cup sugar and two pounds of kosher salt (don't use table salt, because this will pickle your turkey!).  Once dissolved, remove from heat and let cool.  To this basic brine, you can add aromatic flavors, such as maple syrup and apple cider; or a few drops of lavender oil and a half cup of tarragon vinegar; or soy sauce and black pepper.  Now pour the brine into the cooler, and add more water to cover the turkey.  You can leave it in the salty icewater for up to a few days.

3.  Even better – now that the meat is brined, let the skin dry a bit.  Chill uncovered the night before.

“Cook's Illustrated” happened on this technique several years ago.  Brining does wonderful things to turkey meat, but tends to over-soften the skin.  In their test kitchens, they ran out of time at the end of a workday, and so left the ready-to-roast turkey uncovered in the refrigerator overnight.  This dried the skin out, and when they roasted the turkey the next day, the skin was crisp and brown.  You may want to rub the turkey with a nice oily spice rub, for example, sage, salt, and black pepper mixed with olive oil, before or after the uncovered chilling.  If you're going to stuff the turkey, you'd do that between steps 2 and 3.  Chrissie's favorite stuffing recipe, especially for a Red Bourbon turkey, is the recipe for "Pheasant with Leek and Pecan Stuffing" from the original Silver Palate cookbook and reprinted in the new 25th-anniversary special edition.  Go get a copy.  It's worth it.  In the meantime, that recipe follows step 5 (keep reading).

 

4.  Roasting.

There are as many techniques as there are people giving you advice.  You can start at 500°F for the first hour, then turn down to 350°, which New Seasons says will cook a 20-pound, unstuffed turkey in about three hours.  Or you can roast at a constant temperature of 325°F as recommended by Diestel, with estimated times of 3 hours for a 14-pounder, 4 hours for a 19-pounder, 5 hours for a 27-pounder, or 6 hours for a 34-pounder.  Your best bet is always to use a meat thermometer:  the deepest breast meat should register 165°F and the thigh should register 175°F.  Let the bird rest for 15-30 minutes after removing from the oven and before roasting.  During this resting time, you mobilize your guests to move all the other food onto the table and take drink orders and pour the drinks, while you make the gravy.

5.  Gravy.

Sure, you can make a low-fat gravy by adding a few ice cubes to congeal the fat for skimming and then using cornstarch.  But this is Thanksgiving after all, and there's a lot of flavor in meat fat.  I prefer to skim the fat into a saucepan, add an equal amount of flour to make a roux, cook for a few minutes over medium heat until the flour no longer smells raw and begins to color toward blond or caramel, and then add the turkey au jus and stir until thickened. 

CHRISSIE’S FAVORITE RECIPE FOR RED BOURBONS, PHEASANTS, AND GUINEA HENS

Pheasant with Leek and Pecan Stuffing, stolen shamelessly from "The Silver Palate Cookbook" by Julee Russo and Sheila Lukins -- Chrissie's favorite way to prepare pheasant, guinea hen, and Red Bourbon turkey.  Chrissie and Koorosh agree:  Red Bourbon heritage breed turkey is the best poultry of any kind either of us has ever had, bar none.  It's not just for Thanksgiving.

This is hands-down the best poultry stuffing I've ever had.  It takes some work, so whenever I make this recipe, I make a double-batch of the stuffing, and freeze it in ziplock bags before wetting it with broth.  Later when I want to roast something small and simple like a chicken or guinea hens, I just pull the ziplock out of the freezer, pour hot broth over the stuffing, stuff my bird, and roast.

On an amusing sidenote, the recipe is prefaced this way in the cookbook:  "We think pheasant is one of the most delicious of the domestically raised game birds available to us.  It is rich and meaty, with a firm texture no longer found in chicken.  If care is taken during roasting, the meat is moist and succulent."  Of course our customers know that you can in fact still get Real Chicken, and this recipe works great with chicken too.  And guinea hen.  And almost any game bird.

2 pheasants or guinea hens, or one large roasting chicken, or a Red Bourbon Turkey
1 tbsp olive oil
1/2 cup finely chopped yellow onion
1 large carrot, peeled and finely chopped
2 tbsp plus 1 tsp dried marjoram, or 2 cups fresh in season
1/4 tsp dried thyme, or 1 tbsp fresh in season
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs Italian parsley
3 cups chicken stock (of course make your own from Kookoolan Farms feet and necks, don't buy canned)
12 Tbsp (1.5 sticks) sweet butter
10 medium-sized leeks, white part only, well cleaned and thinly sliced
6 cups crumbs from good-quality white or wheat bread
2 cups toasted pecans
1 cup finely chopped Italian parsley
4 slices of pancetta, 4 oz total (bacon can be substituted, but pancetta really tastes different and better! -- buy the most expensive pancetta at Viande Meats inside Pastaworks/City Market in northwest Portland, it really does make a difference in this recipe!)
1/2 cup heavy cream

1.  Rinse poultry inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels.  If organs are available, chop neck, heart and gizzard but save the liver for another use.
2.  heat oil in a small saucepan.  Brown neck and giblets well, turning frequently.  Add onion, carrot, and 1 tsp marjoram.  Reduce heat to low and cook covered undtil vegetables are tender, about 25 minutes.
3.  uncover, add thyme, bay, parsley, and stock, and season with a pinch of salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, for 45 minutes.  Strain the stock, discarding the solids, and reserve.
4.  melt the butter in a skillet.  stir in the sliced leeks and cook covered over low heat about 30 minutes until very tender.
5.  toss the leeks and their butter with the bread crumbs, pecans, chopped parsley, and remaining marjoram.  Season lightly with salt and generously with pepper, and toss again.  (NOTE:  at this point you can freeze part of the stuffing for later convenience.)  If the stuffing seems dry, moisten it with the reserved broth.
6.  preheat the oven to 375 F.
7.  Stuff your poultry, truss if necessary, and drape the breasts with pancetta.  Set the birds in a roasting pan.
8. set the roasting pan in the middle of the oven and roast until done, basting occasionally with the fat and juices that accumulate.  Chrissie likes to test smaller birds by pricking the thigh to check that the juices are clear; for turkeys, check the breast temperature.  When done, remove the birds from the pan, cover with foil, and keep warm while you make the gravy.
9.  Pour excess fat out of the pan (of course reserve it for later sauteeing of vegetables and potatoes).  Pour reserved stock and heavy cream into the pan, and set over medium heat.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, sturring and scraping up any browned bits, until sauce is reduced by about one third.  Taste and correct seasoning with salt and pepper, and morethyme if desired.
10. Carve birds, arrange the meat on a platter, mound the stuffing in the center of the platter, and drizzle the meat and stuffing with the sauce.  Serve immediately, passing the remaining sauce in a boat.

Recipes from Stumptown Savoury

Basic Brine

6 quarts water
1 cup kosher salt
¼-½ sugar or other sweetener(s)

Molasses Brine

6 quarts water
1 cup kosher salt
¼ cup grade B maple syrup
¼ cup blackstrap molasses
4 whole cloves
1 cinnamon stick about 3" long
1 medium navel orange, quartered and squeezed into the brine
1 small bunch parsley
3 whole star anise
1 teaspoon whole allspice

Apple Brine

2 quarts apple juice or cider
4 quarts water
1 cup kosher salt
¼ cup sugar
4 sage leaves, rubbed
1 teaspoon whole allspice
4 whole cloves
1 cinnamon stick about 3" long

 

Tequila-Agave Brine

6 quarts water
1 cup kosher salt
½ cup agave syrup
¼ cup tequila
2 limes, quartered and squeezed into the brine

 

Cranberry-Pear Salsa

12 ounces cranberries, fresh or frozen, roughly chopped
2 pears, diced
1 yellow bell pepper, seeded and diced
1 serrano chile, seeded and diced
zest of 1 orange
1 tablespoon blue agave syrup or honey
1 tablespoon canola oil
salt to taste

Mix ingredients together and adjust the seasoning. If you want more heat, use the seeds or add another chile. Best served at room temperature.

Cranberry-Apple Chutney

12 ounces cranberries, fresh or frozen
1 Fuji apple, seeded and chopped
1 Macintosh apple, seeded and chopped
zest and juice of 1 navel orange
1 cup mulling spice simple syrup
¼ cup mulling spices (tied in cheesecloth)
¼ cup chopped crystallized ginger
2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
salt to taste

If you don't have mulling spice simple syrup, you can make it by mixing 1 cup sugar with 1 cup water and ¼ cup mulling spices. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer 5 minutes. Alternatively, make the chutney using 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water in place of the simple syrup.

Put all the ingredients into a pan over medium-low heat. Simmer until the cranberries release their juice, about 10 minutes. Continue simmering, stirring frequently, until thickened, then remove the spices in cheesecloth. Adjust the seasoning. This can be served warm, at room temperature, or chilled.

Cranberry-Orange Relish

12 ounces cranberries, fresh or frozen
1 medium navel orange, cut into 8 wedges, peel and all
1/3 cup chopped crystallized ginger
1 tablespoon sugar
salt to taste

Using a food processor, pulse the ingredients until roughly chopped. Adjust the seasoning. Serve chilled.

Chocolate Mousse

1 lb. bittersweet chocolate (63% cacao)
8 oz. unsalted butter
¼ teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
1 shot espresso (optional)
pinch of salt (optional)
4 egg yolks
8 egg whites
pinch cream of tartar (optional)
1 cup heavy cream

Gently melt the chocolate and butter, then stir in the optional cinnamon, espresso, and salt. Separate four eggs, stirring the yolks into the melted chocolate and reserving the whites. Then separate four more eggs, reserving the yolks for crème anglaise or another recipe. Whip the cream to stiff peaks, then whip the egg whites, optionally adding a pinch of cream of tartar, to soft peaks. Gently fold the whipped cream into the chocolate mixture. Give the whites a finally touch-up with a whisk, then fold into the mousse.

Line a 1-pound loaf pan generously with plastic wrap, then pour the mousse into the pan, tap it on the counter to remove air bubbles, fold the plastic over the mousse to cover, then refrigerate. It will usually set within an hour, but tastes best if you leave it overnight.

Crème Anglaise

½ cup milk (4 ounces)
½ cup heavy cream (4 ounces)
½ vanilla bean
4 egg yolks (2 ounces)
¼ cup sugar (2 ounces)

Mix the milk and cream in a small saucepan. Split the vanilla bean and scrape the seeds into the pan, then add the pod. Bring just to a simmer, then remove from the heat and let steep for 15 minutes or so to infuse the dairy with vanilla flavor.

Partially fill the largest bowl with equal parts ice and water, and set the larger of the remaining bowls on the ice. Set a strainer in place over that bowl.

After the vanilla has infused the dairy to your satisfaction, remove the vanilla pod, then return the pan to gentle heat and stir frequently. In the third bowl, quickly whisk the yolks and sugar together. Once the dairy reaches a simmer, remove it from the heat and whisk about a tablespoon of it into the yolk and sugar mixture. Continue adding the dairy to the yolk and sugar mixture slowly to avoid curdling.

Once the dairy, yolks, and sugar are fully incorporated, return the custard to the pan and return the pan to the heat. Stir constantly for 1-4 minutes until the custard coats the back of a spoon. Pour through the strainer into the bowl over the ice. Stir until cool, cover, and refrigerate. If it sits overnight the vanilla flavor will be more pronounced. Serve cold, room temperature, or even warm, as your dessert requires.

Chorizo

3¼ pounds boneless pork shoulder, cut into 1" cubes
2 tablespoons kosher or sea salt
1 tablespoon ancho chile powder
2 teaspoons chipotle chile powder
1 teaspoon achiote chile powder
½ teaspoon guajillo chile powder
½ teaspoon ground cumin
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro
50ml (3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon) tequila

Start by cleaning and cubing the pork. You'll want to remove as much as possible of the "silver skin" and tendons as possible. You might find that you need some extra pork fat if the piece of meat you've selected is too lean. Mix the meat with everything except the tequila and refrigerate for at least two hours or up to overnight. Chill the tequila as well.

You want to chill everything because grinding the meat involves friction, which generates heat. The more chilled your meat is to start with, the better the resulting texture and flavor.

When you're ready to grind the sausage, set up your stand mixer with a food grinder attachment, or set up your meat grinder if you have one. You'll also need a bowl of ice to hold the catch bowl for your sausage; once again, you want to keep the sausage as chilled as possible.

Grind the sausage using a medium grind, then place it in the work bowl of your stand mixer. Using the flat paddle attachment, mix the chilled tequila into the sausage for 1-2 minutes. Quickly cook as small bit of the sausage and taste to adjust the seasonings. Remember that as the sausage cures the flavors will intensify.

Remove the sausage to a storage container and refrigerate for a day before using--if you can wait that long, that is. This sausage freezes well and will last 1-3 months, depending on how cold you keep your freezer.

Buttermilk Cornbread

1 tablespoon rendered bacon fat (or canola oil)
1½ cups white cornmeal (or yellow)
¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons sugar (optional)
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
¼ cup canola oil
1½ cups cultured buttermilk
1 large egg

Start by preheating your oven to 450°F/230°C. Once it's ready, add the bacon fat to the skillet and put it into the oven to preheat. You'll want to give the pan at least 10-15 minutes to get hot, so take your time.

Whisk all the dry ingredients together until well mixed and any lumps of baking soda have disappeared. The small amount of sugar in this recipe isn't enough to sweeten the bread, but if you're in the "No Sugar in Cornbread!" camp, or cooking for someone who is, leave it out.

In a separate bowl, thoroughly mix the wet ingredients, then add to the dry ingredients and mix until they just come together. Remove the hot pan from the oven--the bacon fat should be smoking slightly. Carefully pour the batter into the pan, then put the pan back into the oven.

Bake for 18 minutes or so, until the bread is set and slightly browned. Remove the pan from the oven and let it cool about five minutes.

 

 

Basic Dressing

8 cups bread cubes
1 onion, diced (about ½ cup)
½ cup diced celery
1-2 cups turkey stock

Sauté the onion and celery until the onion is translucent. In a large bowl, mix with the bread cubes, then mix in hot turkey stock until the bread is just moistened.

For Cornbread Dressing, use 5 cups of cornbread and 3 cups of white bread.

Candied Sweet Potatoes

3 lbs. sweet potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/8-inch thick
kosher salt
½ cup chopped pecans
¼-½ cup bourbon
1 cup heavy cream
¾ cup dark brown sugar
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
marshmallows to cover

Butter a 9x13 baking pan. Place a layer of potatoes on the bottom, season with salt, and spread about a third of the pecans on them. Repeat twice more. Pour the bourbon and cream over the potatoes, then spread the brown sugar over the top and dot with butter. Cover with foil and bake in a 350° oven until done, about 50-60 minutes. Remove the dish from the oven and uncover. Top with marshmallows and brown under the broiler about one minute.

Pecan Pie

Pastry crust mix for 9-inch pie (see below)
4 eggs
¾ cup sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1½ cups light corn syrup
1 tablespoon butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup pecan halves

Preheat oven to 400°F. Prepare pie shell. Beat eggs lightly and add sugar, salt, corn syrup, cooled butter, and vanilla; stir until mixed well. Spread pecan halves on bottom crust and cover with the filling. Place in oven and immediately reduce heat to 350°F. Bake 40–50 minutes or until mixture is firm in center. Cool before serving.

Pastry Crust Mix

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons sugar
1 cup shortening
Ice water

Mix dry ingredients together. Blend in shortening with knives or pastry blender until mixture is of pebbly consistency. Store in covered container in refrigerator. When needed, measure out these amounts:

Single crust                   Double crust

8-inch pie   1–1¼ cups            2–2¼ cups
9-inch pie   1½ cups               2½ cups
10-inch pie 1¾ cups               2¾ cups
12 tart shells 2¾ cups

Moisten pastry mix with enough ice water to hold dough together when pushed lightly with a fork. Roll out on lightly floured board or pastry cloth.

Note: When recipe calls for prebaked shells, line pan with dough, prick well with a fork, and bake at 425°F for 12–15 minutes or until golden brown.

Classic Waldorf Salad

½ cup mayonnaise
1 tbsp. sugar
1 tbsp. lemon juice
pinch salt
3 med. apples, diced
1 c. sliced celery
1/2 c. chopped walnuts

Combine first 4 ingredients. Stir in remaining ingredients. Cover and chill. Makes 5 1/2 cups.

Whipped Chipotle Sweet Potatoes

Bake sweet potatoes until very soft. As soon as they are cool enough to handle, cut them in half and scoop the flesh into a bowl. Whip with minced chipotle in adobo, softened butter, and salt, to taste. Spread into a buttered baking dish and bake at 350° until heated through.

Tequila-Chipotle Crème Anglaise

When making crème anglaise (see above for recipe), infuse the cream with one cinnamon stick, one tablespoon of añejo tequila, one teaspoon of minced chipotle in adobo, and ¼ vanilla pod. Proceed as in the basic recipe.

Tequila-Agave Vinaigrette

1 teaspoon grapefruit zest
1 teaspoon orange zest
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons reposada or añejo tequila
2 tablespoons agave nectar or honey
salt and pepper to taste

Butternut Squash Pie

For the crust:

1 cup candied nuts
1 cup finely ground ginger snap crumbs
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted

For the filling:

1½ cups butternut squash purée (or 1-15oz. can of pumpkin purée)
¼ cup maple syrup
¼ cup light brown sugar
1½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla paste (or extract)
3 eggs, beaten
¾ cup heavy cream

To make the crust, process the candied nuts in a food processor until finely ground. In a bowl, combine with the cookie crumbs and mix thoroughly. Add the melted butter and stir until the mix is thoroughly moistened. Pour into a 9-inch pie dish and press the mixture with your fingers until it evenly coats the bottom and sides. Set aside.

In a large bowl, mix the filling ingredients thoroughly, then pour into the prepared pie shell. Bake at 350° until a thin skewer or toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean, about 45-55 minutes. Let cool for at least 30 minutes before serving.

 

 

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